Back to...

GET VISIBLE! Advertise Here. Find Out More




Share Our Stories! - Click Here



 

Muslims Spreading Polio Through Melbourne Sewers


From Patricia Doyle
12-20-17

 

Hello Jeff  -Three guesses where the Polio came from in Melbourne, Australia.

Melbourne is one of the cities that took a lot of the UN 'refugees' for relocating.

The UN and the countries that take these people in do not do ANY serious health screening.

This is an outrage.  How long before we see a return to the 1940s and 50s when Polio was king and many children and adults were left in leg braces for life due to polio. I still remember seeing hospital wards with children in iron lungs.

Are we in the first, second and some of the third world willing to risk infection with Polio again?  Only for the sake of allowing 'refugees' whose prime directive is to kill us into our homeland?  Why do we allow it? We risk our health and that of our families because we do not want to antagonize the 'refugees' or be called 'racist'? These 'refugees' - if they really were refugees - should accept full health screening.  Instead, they are jihad invaders and do not want to be checked for diseases. They prefer to spread the diseases in the First World.  They are here as our mortal enemies...not here to work hard and assimilate.

It is time to send the so called 'refugee' jihad invaders HOME.

Patty



Published Date: 12-15-17
Subject: PRO/EDR> Poliomyelitis update (43): (Australia), positive environmental sample, RFI
Archive Number: 20171215.5506172

POLIOMYELITIS UPDATE (43): AUSTRALIA, POSITIVE ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLE, REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
********************************************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

[1]
Date: Fri 15 Dec 2017 1:05PM
Source: The Age [edited]
http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/polio-virus-discovered-at-melbourne-sewerage-plant-20171215-h058n8.html


The polio virus has been detected in Melbourne's sewerage system, prompting health authorities to issue a warning about the importance of vaccinations.

The childhood disease once killed or paralysed thousands of young people each year, but a global effort to eradicate the virus has all but wiped it out.

On [Fri 15 Dec 2017], Victoria's acting chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton announced polio had been detected in tiny concentrations as part of routine testing of pre-treated sewerage at the Western Treatment Plant in Melbourne.

However he said the discovery did not necessarily mean someone had polio.

Dr Sutton said it was more likely that the polio virus came from a person who had received live polio vaccine when travelling or living overseas, and had continued to excrete it since arriving in Victoria.

Oral polio vaccines - administered in some countries - contain a weakened live virus and work by activating the immune response in the body, but have not been used in Australia for more than a decade.

In areas where there is poor sanitation, there is a risk people can acquire polio through the excreted vaccine.

An inactivate polio vaccine is used in Australia, which means it cannot multiply in a person, is not found in the bowel or sewage and cannot cause polio disease.

Dr Sutton said there was an extremely low risk that anyone in Victoria would have become infected as a result of the virus detected in sewerage.

"Firstly, polio virus usually doesn't cause illness even when infection occurs. Secondly, this polio virus was found at concentrations that do not cause infection. Finally, Australia has very high immunisation coverage and excellent sanitation infrastructure that prevents people being exposed to sewage," Dr Sutton said.

"There are currently no cases of polio in Australia. The last case of polio was in 2007 in a traveller who acquired the infection in Pakistan. Victoria hasn't had a locally acquired case since the 1970s."

Worldwide, polio cases have decreased by more than 99 per cent since 1988 - from more than 350 000 to just 37 reported cases in 2016. Countries where the virus persists include Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria.

Some older Australians, aged in their fifties or above, still live with disability as a result of contacting polio as children. Polio survivors are said to be Australia's largest physical disability group.

The rate of polio vaccination in Victoria is now above 95 per cent for children aged 5 years or older.

The National Immunisation Program provides a free polio vaccine at 2, 4 and 6 months of age. A booster dose is provided at 4 years of age.

Also, from July 2017 everyone up to 19 years, refugees and humanitarian entrants have been eligible to receive 3 doses of polio vaccine as part of catch-up arrangements.

Dr Sutton said this high level of immunisation made any risk of polio occurring in Victoria extremely low, but the positive test was a reminder for people to make sure their immunisations were up to date.

[Byline: Aisha Dow]

--
Communicated by:
Alexandra Volosinas
<alexandra.volosinas@gmail.com>

******
[2]
Date: Fri 15 Dec 2017
Source: Health Victoria [edited]
https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/about/media-centre/mediareleases/health-surveillance-system-detects-poliovirus


Victoria's unique environmental testing program has detected poliovirus in pre-treated sewage from the Western Treatment Plant in Melbourne.

Victoria's acting Chief Health Officer, Dr Brett Sutton, said the virus was detected in tiny concentrations as part of routine environmental surveillance in Victoria that supports the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

"This does not mean someone has polio. Rather it is likely to have come from a person who received live vaccine in another country and has continued to excrete it since arriving in Victoria,' Dr Sutton said.

"There are currently no cases of polio in Australia. The last case of polio was in 2007 in a traveller who acquired the infection in Pakistan. Victoria hasn't had a locally acquired case since the 1970s.

"Genetic analysis has now been completed, identifying the virus as a rare type 2 poliovirus.

"There is an extremely low risk that the detection of this poliovirus will cause disease in anyone.

"Firstly, poliovirus usually doesn't cause illness even when infection occurs. Secondly, this poliovirus was found at concentrations that do not cause infection. Finally, Australia has very high immunisation coverage and excellent sanitation infrastructure that prevents people being exposed to sewage," Dr Sutton said.

Australia, through the National Immunisation Program provides a free polio vaccine at 2, 4 and 6 months of age. A booster dose is provided at 4 years of age.

An inactivated polio vaccine is used in Australia, which means it cannot multiply in a person, is not found in the bowel or sewage and cannot cause polio disease.

Polio immunisation coverage in Victoria is above 95 per cent for children at 5 years of age -- amongst the highest in the country.

In addition, from July 2017 everyone up to the age of 19 years and refugees and humanitarian entrants of all ages have been eligible to receive 3 doses of polio vaccine as part of catch up arrangements.

Dr Sutton said this high level of immunisation in children and adults makes any risk of polio occurring in Victoria extremely low.

"Further testing of sewage samples from the Western Treatment Plant in Melbourne will happen for the foreseeable future to monitor the situation.

"However, this is a timely reminder, especially for children, to be immunised so they can be protected from all serious diseases, whether common or rare," Dr Sutton said.

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail
<promed@promedmail.org>

[One presumes that the "rare type 2 poliovirus" is a vaccine derived poliovirus as WPV2 (wild poliovirus type 2) was declared eradicated by the Global Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication (GCC) on 20 Sep 2015, after review of documents confirming that the last detected WPV2 was in Aligarh, northern India in 1999. (http://polioeradication.org/news-post/global-eradication-of-wild-poliovirus-type-2-declared/). That being said, the above report does not mention if the isolated virus was a VDPV (vaccine derived polio virus) or a WPV. In addition, in the event this is a VDPV, is this a recent vaccinee's virus or is this a cVDPV (circulating vaccine derived poliovirus - a cVDPV has been in circulation with multiple passages through humans resulting in a reversion in neurovirulence so that the virus is able to cause paralytic polio indistinguishable clinically from that seen with disease associated with the WPV)?

As there has been documented cVDPV2 activity in Syria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) during 2017 (see prior ProMED posts below), it is possible that the PV2 (poliovirus type 2) isolated is related to individuals returning from one of these 2 areas. Or, as rightly mentioned in the above notices, it is also possible that an individual returning from another country where the OPV was possibly administered as part of vaccination activities. (See yesterday's polio update for locations of increased polio vaccination response activities outside of Syria and the DRC).

I can continue speculating on possible origins of this isolate but the best approach at this time would be to request more information from knowledgeable sources on the full genetic profile of the isolate including geographic relationships with possible other poliovirus 2 isolates in recent times.

I would also reiterate from the above announcements that with the high vaccination coverages reported in Victoria, Australia, the isolation of a poliovirus in small amounts in sewage sampling suggests little to no existing nor threat of widespread circulation in Victoria.

The Western (sewage and water) Treatment Plant (formerly known as the Metropolitan Sewage Farm or, the Werribee Sewage Farm) is a 110 km2 [42.47 miles2] sewage treatment plant located in Cocoroc, Victoria, Australia. It is located 30 km [18.64 miles] west of Melbourne's central business district, on the coast of Port Phillip Bay. Bordering the plant's land area is the Werribee River to the east, the Princes Freeway to the north, and Avalon Airport to the west. It is also part of the Port Phillip Bay (Western Shoreline) and Bellarine Peninsula Ramsar Site as a wetland of international importance. The plant processes approximately 50 per cent of Melbourne's sewage. (a more detailed description of the plant is available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Treatment_Plant and https://www.melbournewater.com.au/community-and-education/about-our-water/sewerage/western-treatment-plant.

The HealthMap/ProMED map of Victoria Australia can be found at: http://healthmap.org/promed/p/288. - Mod.MPP]